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protecting the rights of employees in rhode island

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family medical leave act (fmla) Archives

The importance of family medical leave protections

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides protections for job-protected leave for up to 12 weeks for an employee's serious medical condition or a serious medical condition of an employee's covered family member. Rhode Island Parental and Family Medical Leave (RIFML) is a similar state law in Rhode Island except that it provides up to 13 weeks of job-protected leave for an employee or covered family member's serious medical condition.

Pregnancy discrimination is prohibited in Rhode Island

In Rhode Island, discrimination based on pregnancy is prohibited. The Rhode Island Fair Employment Practices Act prohibits discrimination based on sex, including discrimination based on pregnancy, childbirth and related medical conditions unless there is a concern based on a bona fide occupational qualification.

Understanding how family and medical leave works

Family and medical leave, and understanding the legal rights associated with family and medical leave, can be increasingly important for families struggling with a variety of issues. Dealing with an illness in the family or other family-related situations can be stressful enough without worrying about a job. The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides important protections for employees who need to leave their job in certain circumstances.

Understanding the Family Medical Leave Act

The Family Medical Leave Act is an important federal law for many workers and their families to understand. The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) allows workers who are covered by the law to take extended time away from work for family or medical needs. Many states have similar laws that may also include more expansive coverage so it is helpful to be familiar with the different state laws.

Is the employer required to return me to my prior job under FMLA?

Rhode Islanders who have exercised their rights to take time off from work by using the Family Medical Leave Act must also remember that they have certain rights when returning to work. Unfortunately, there are still employers who violate employment law with certain activities that might be used to dissuade an employee for using FMLA and do so in an underhanded manner. Or they simply do not grant an employee his or her rights when returning to work. For example, a worker has the right to return to the same job he or she left when using FMLA or one that is nearly identical. If an employer does not allow a worker this right, it could be the basis for a legal filing.

Walmart employees allege issues with company's sick leave policy

There are federal and state laws in place to allow eligible employees to take time off of work to take care of their personal lives. The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) allows eligible employees who work for employers with 50 or more workers to take up to 12 weeks off work for a variety of reasons, including the birth of a child, serious illness and caring for a sick relative. This allows employees to take time off for legitimate reasons without the fear of losing their jobs. However, according to the non-profit legal advocacy group A Better Balance, many Walmart employees report that the company does penalize employees for utilizing their sick leave.

Protecting your employment rights under the FMLA

Many working people in Rhode Island will eventually have to deal with a personal emergency that requires them to take some time off of work. Many people may need more than just a day or two. If you work for a Rhode Island employer with 50 or more employees, you are likely covered by the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

Am I eligible for FMLA leave?

If you or a family member has experienced a significant life event, you may need to take some time off of work to deal with the situation. The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) allows certain employees to take up to 12 workweeks off over the course of a year for multiple reasons, including the birth of a child, the onset of serious health conditions, or to care for a sick spouse, child or parent. Some employees may be permitted to take up to 26 workweeks off over a 12-month period to care for a covered service member with an illness or injury.

An overview of the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

The United States government understands the importance of family. In the middle of the 20th century, it was believed that the bond between a newborn and its mother were most important. But it became increasingly more apparent that the relationship between a father and his new child is also vitally important to the well-being of both child and parent.

A brief history of the Family and Medical Leave Act

Although the Family and Medical Leave Act, or FMLA is relatively young in the United States, its beginning extended years before it finally became law in 1993 under President Bill Clinton. It actually first was introduced to Congress a decade earlier in 1984, but was met with resistance and was blocked each year until 1991, when it was vetoed by President George H. W. Bush. It again passed in Congress in 1992, but was again blocked by President Bush.